Wouldn’t This Have Been Stunning?

A Collection of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unbuilt Designs

Master plan

I know you might find this difficult to believe. But it is  a master plan showing seventy-five of Frank Lloyd Wright’s original designs placed on 450 acres on a plot of land along the Kawaihae Road leading from the Ocean on the Kohala Coast of the Island of Hawaii up to the town of Kamuela.

It was prepared in 1984 by John Rattenbury of the Taliesin Architects, a part of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. The Taliesin Architects were the only ones authorized to preside over the construction of any of Wright’s plans after his death. The project was called the “Hawaii Collection.”  These structures  were sited specifically to these locations, meaning that they were not just indicated but could have actually been built on those sites.

There were three phases of 150 acres each with approximately twenty-five homes per phase.

While the project never materialized on the Island of Hawaii, the idea incorporating thirty of these designs  was licensed to the Waikapu Mauka Partners in 1989 for a site on the West Maui Mountains of Maui.

Frank Lloyd Wright died in 1959 and Mrs. Wright placed a moratorium on his designs for twenty-five years. In 1984 a small group of us, called the Waimea Development Group, approached the Foundation, unaware that the moratorium had just been lifted. In one sense we were an unlikely group made up of an ad guy, me; an architect, a lawyer, and a veterinarian. There was an innocence about us following this idea that appealed to the Foundation. We had no money and actually found that in our favor as Wright had said that money and good ideas rarely travel in the same company.

Sandy’s upcoming book, How Frank Lloyd Wright Got Into My Head Under My Skin And Changed The Way I Think About Thinking, A Blueprint For Creative Thinking In The21st Century gives the details of what transpired in this journey.

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