Architecture

Sims House

The Sims House, a Frank Lloyd Wright original design on the Island of Hawaii.

It is said that one of the great adventures in life is to build a house. Well, indeed it was that. By the time I undertook this project I had become thoroughly aware that Wright was not only a genius but a mystic. While it would be fair to say that it was exciting enough to build one of his last designs, I was drawn like a moth to the light to experience life inside this design. I did find out and of course wrote about it as I mention below.

This house, first designed  in 1954 to be built in Pennsylvania, was well-suited to the three acre site in Kamuela, Hawaii.  Ground was broken in 1992 and finished in 1996. It had been originally  intended by Sandy to serve as a focus home for a project called the “ HAWAII COLLECTION,”  a compilation of Frank Lloyd Wright’s un-built designs planned for construction on a 450 acres approximately a mile or so down the road from the focus home.

The collection idea did take root on Maui in 1989, with the construction of a clubhouse based on a composite of home designs by Wright (executed by the Taliesin Architects of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation), and a license to build thirty of Mr. Wright’s original designs. The collapse of the Japanese stock market in 1990, unfortunately, brought the housing project to a standstill.

Many years before a home had been designed for Hawaii by Wright. It was for a Judge Martin Pence. But construction estimates were too high and Pence abandoned the project.

The story of the collection and building of this house is partially  the subject of Sandy’s soon to be released  book, How Frank Lloyd Wright Got Into My Head Under My Skin And Changed The Way I Think About Thinking, A Creative Thinking Blueprint For  The 21rst Century.

See construction and finished photos in posts under Architecture classification.

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