About Sandy’s books

Passing through Turkey

Some people would claim Sandy has been leading a charmed life. Born into a well-to-do family in the summer of 42 his formative years were spent in Hollywood. In fact his mom, who is fast approaching 100, claims he was the first baby Robert Wagner at age nine ever held. Later he would grow up in Tallahassee, Florida, a model expression of the American dream with two universities a state capital and no industry. Faye Dunaway was even the head cheerleader of his basketball team. After college, and during the Vietnam conflict, the Navy would commission and send him to Hawaii and then to Japan to run the Officers’ club at Yokosuka. Having been mesmerized by Honolulu City Lights he would return after graduate school, land in a start-up advertising agency as a partner, spend a short working career of twenty-three years in Paradise, sell the agency and retire at age 52 to a life of inner and outer exploration on his own terms.

But beneath this surface story there runs a far richer vein of curiosity about the larger forces in the universe, our potential powers, and how to access these. A health crisis catalyzed a cascade of events: a girl friend surgeon turned psychiatrist rewired his brain, sending him  tumbling down the “Rabbit Hole” into new realms, where he became open to trying out new thinking patterns and recording the results. Over the next several years there was fire-walking, spoon-bending, trips to Peru and Brazil where  psychic surgeons stuck knitting needles through his liver forcing him to accept almost in disbelief that we could be in different realities at the same time. Into his life poured mystics, shamans, kahunas, ethnobotanists, channels, luminaries, scientists, and even an astronaut. The Caddy family, founders of the Scottish Findhorn Spiritual Community noted for growing forty and fifty pound vegetables and roses from the snow, regularly came and stayed with him. These new patterns of thinking he cautiously tested, raising the bar slowly, then testing again and again, culminating in one compelling “aha”  idea to build, as a collection. the designs of perhaps America’s greatest architect, Frank Lloyd Wright.

How Frank Lloyd Wright Got Into My Head Under My Skin And Changed The Way I Think About Thinking, A  Creative Thinking Blueprint For The 21st Century is Sandy’s report of this compelling odyssey. It is available now.

Using this journey’s examples, he has teamed up with psychiatrist, Kerry Monick, MD, who shared part of his adventure to write:

Creative Thinking For The 21rst Century, An Experiential Guidebook.

Their observations are that we seem to be rushing headlong into a watershed of epic proportions: Societies are facing unprecedented challenges. Technology is compressing our sense of time at a bewildering pace. The luxury of thinking time is vanishing. Fragile world economies, a challenged environment and dysfunctional governments are facing us. The news media is filled with experts rendering sound bites on diametrically opposing viewpoints. We are on information overload resulting in a kind of psychic numbing. Depending entirely on our linear thinking patterns to guide our daily lives no longer works like it once did. We must all become cartographers, learning to map the nature of our intuitive world, observing how thinking with intention seems to work, and how to best use and trust these processes. Sandy and Kerry explore the idea of a conscious connection with other realms where co-partners through  synchronicities and perhaps our sudden flashes of insight or intuition reflect the communication of these co-partners.

The guidebook concisely addresses not just how to think but suggests what to think about, with ideas for overcoming fears, and strategies for understanding and using our intuition. Sandy and Kerry believe that an ultimate goal is to arrive at that state called “Flow,” where we  balance our intuitive information with our analytical brain in a state of fluidity as events of life appear on our radar screen. It is also available now.

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